Mange & Disease

Mange is one of the biggest killers of wombats. The mange mite buries itself under the wombat’s skin triggering extreme itchiness which makes the wombat scratch, causing open wounds and scabs to form.  These become infected, the wombat loses condition, becomes dehydrated, malnourished and slowly dies. The good news is, it can be treated. In this section, you can learn more about how to identify mange and what to do if you come across a wombat with mange.

If you have any questions regarding mange or would like to speak to one of our experts, please contact us on mange@wombatprotection.org.au

 
This wombat’s fur is growing back nicely after being treated for mange.

This wombat’s fur is growing back nicely after being treated for mange.

what is Mange and how to treat it

Mange is one of the biggest threats to Australian wombats. It can wipe out isolated colonies in just a few years. It is geographically widespread and affects thousands of animals. Marie Wynan, Director at WPSA, takes a look at sarcoptic mange and how it can be treated.

 
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Mange – Frequently asked questions

Here we tackle some questions you may have when treating mange. Should you have have any further questions or concerns not covered in our document, please contact us at info@wombatprotection.org.au

 
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HOW TO MAKE A WIRE FRAME TO HOLD A BURROW FLAP

A guide that shows you how to make a simple device in order to easily bend a wire frame for your burrow flap. You will be able to use this device again and again.

 
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TREATING MANGE

The Wombat Protection Society has been working for many years with groups and individuals to eradicate mange throughout Australia.

This download booklet is for people who want to develop a treatment program in their area.

If you would like more detailed information on mange treatment and you are a licensed carer, you can look here. Otherwise, please download information booklet.

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Surviving Mange, One Joey’s story

Read of one wombat joey’s story saved from the slow, painful death that can be caused by mange.

 
Elena Guarracino is a LAOKO wildlife rescue volunteer. She walks for kilometres each day tracking wombats that need mange treatment. Photograph: Lisa Hogben

Elena Guarracino is a LAOKO wildlife rescue volunteer. She walks for kilometres each day tracking wombats that need mange treatment. Photograph: Lisa Hogben

Experts call for a National Plan to Help Save Wombats from Mange

The incoming environment minister has a clear opportunity to tackle this debilitating disease. Wildlife carers and conservationists want to make the issue of mange a priority.
The Guardian, by Alexandra Spring

 
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SARCOPTIC MANGE IN AUSTRALIAN WILDLIFE

Sarcoptic mange is an infestation of the parasitic mite sarcoptes scabiei. The parasite can infect both humans and wildlife, with the condition referred to as scabies and mange respectively.

Learn more about sarcoptic mange, how many species it affects and the signs to look out for.

 
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What to expect when treating mange

When treating a wombat for mange, it will look worse before it gets better. As scabs fall off, new pink skin is exposed making the wombat look sickly. Don’t despair! Your treatment is working and eventually the wombat will grow a healthy new coat of fur.

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Mange treatment any landowner can adopt

Wombat in Australia face many challenges such as drought and the destruction of their habitat. However, sarcoptic mange can be one of the most painful ways for a wombat to die. Learn how one landowner is taking an innovative approach to treating this horrible disease.

 
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MAKING A WOMBAT BURROW FLAP

One of the most effective ways of treating mange is placing a flap at the wombat’s burrow entrance. This will ensure a wombat gets the regular doses needed throughout the treatment period.

 
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HOW LONG DO MANGE MITES SURVIVE?

Mange mites can survive between two days and three weeks after a host has died depending on relative humidity and temperature.

Learn how quickly these mites can infest and how they may effect other mammals.

 
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Cydectin Mange treatment medication

Read about WPSA’s policy on supplying mange treatment medication to wildlife groups and individuals.